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are strong. you can identify that pattern and when and former partners. dhs, fbi, cia, the white house, we sit on these policy boards so that we can all collectively address the problem that will take us into the next century. our best defense is going to be understanding the offense. as an intelligence organization, we spend a lot of time in the offensive mud. we collect human intelligence. as they consider ways to address the threats in the 21st century, left to also understand they're not all technology base. you all of legislation that drives what you do every day. i would anticipate this year, senator collins introduced a cyber security bill. it was geared towards a single owner of all things cyber. it is kind of hard when you have millions of people working for the government. in the end, you'll see cyber legislation that addresses standards of operating -- operating standards of performance, standards of protection, and how each agency does it will be very different. so much like a common definition lexicon, there will be standards. laws that can define acceptable behavior in cybers
to the normal criminal element. and the third is what f.b.i. director robert mueller said, there is a very real possibility trainees will recruit more terrorists from among the federal inmate population and continue al qaeda operations from the inside, which is how the new york synagogue bombers were recruited. all of these things are -- we shouldn't even be debating this. the ayotte amendment is one that would take care of this. we don't have to worry about it from year to year. we don't have to anguish over this thing that we've decided several times. i can remember, i guess it was back in the early administration of obama, when he identified 17 areas in the united states that would be appropriate for incarcerating terrorists, that we would take out of gitmo. and one of those places happened to be fort sill in my state of oklahoma. i went down to fort sill. i looked at the facility that we had that was housed within fort sill facility. and there was a lady there whose name was sergeant major carter. i can remember when she came up to me, she said, senator, why in the world -- go back and tell
various leading government officials up there all back that up, including director of the fbi. i'm paraphrasing, but he said these two categories of companies. those that have been compromised and will be gorgeous so delicate. so that's the shocking statistics to take. it is not uncommon for a credit card company to come back to emerge it and say hey, our threat vector detection system is more sophisticated than yours. we are picking up some indications he been compromised. here's what you need to look at. some recent examples of some very high profile and public incidents that have occurred recently. rsa, the cybersecurity company files was breached in 2011 and that led to a number of other breaches because their systems are used by many companies to provide this company's own security systems. in addition, there is a classic financial crimes case involving sony. i think that one of the takeaways from these examples is that these are not -- these are companies technologically sophisticated pressure in the cyberworld and they themselves were reached. so these are wal-marts for co
on the specifics of the investigation. the fbi has its own protocols in terms of how they proceed. and i'm going to let director mueller and others examine those protocols, and make some statements to the public generally. i do want to emphasize what i said before. general petraeus had an extraordinary career. deserved this country with great distinction in iraq, in afghanistan, and as head of the cia. by his own assessment, he did not meet the standards that he felt were necessary as the director of cia with respect to this personal matter that he is now dealing with, with his family, and with his wife. and it's on that basis that he tendered his resignation, and it's on that basis that i accepted it. but i want to emphasize that from my perspective at least, he has provided this country and extraordinary service. we are safer because of the work that dave petraeus has done, and my main hope right now is that he and his family are able to move on, and that this instead of being -- this into a being a single side note on what has been otherwise been an extraordinary career. [inaudible] >> you kn
states and defeated an incumbent president by a larger margin than fbi and -- at tiahrt and herbert hoover. he did among the various subgroups the women, african-americans, asians, hispanics, 18 to 29 and so forth and you overly his performance in 1980 over this electorate, he loses by the same amount that rahm needed -- romney did. this is a long-term problem for the party. the country is becoming more diverse. of the country's aging, and this is going to present some challenges for the party. i am relatively optimistic that they can find ways to build bridges to those voters that they need to get about it now. >> ralph you talk about demographics and we have other panelists we have ever heard from yet but since you were leaving early i want to ask you haven't mentioned the issue free of the conversation and the christian conservative community. it does seem to me to have a role. can you talk about foreign policy or the individuals and how the christian community is now with the conservative christian community is looking at those issues? >> we are still looking at a post-election
more problematic. i think one of the other panelists mentioned this quote from fbi director, and you see the same concerns of talking about in the commercial sphere, to. he said basically set to every company is being hacked one way or another and it's not a question of when they will be hacked. it will be a question of when it will happen again. that might be a pessimistic view of how bitter cybersecurity sector can be. it is certainly a theme you see in the space. my only point, the only other point i want to make on commercial data is that you see and report. there was a report issued by verizon about data breach investigation, that suggests that a lease in endears large numbers of serious cyber intrusions intrusions have been aimed at create taking authentication credential, passwords, usernames, things like that. things that can be used for later inclusion's in the future, things that might give an intruder broader access to a network. so i'd like to shift for a moment, those ideas in mind, and talk about offense of cyber operations. and what do we mean by that and what is, what
are not having a war on your orders and making sure the international community sends billions of fbi success and making sure that the people see results for their elections, and political success is making sure that hamas and gaza doesn't govern the relationship with egypt but that egypt governs the relationship with a hamas. if this is the root of the government of egypt pursues, then the potential for the working relationship with israel is possible. if it tries to achieve political success in the it the logical means, then we in the united states will be in a very difficult position and the israelis will be in an even more difficult position. .. >> you have a question earlier. no? okay, howard. >> ten years ago we were frantically trying to buy stinger missiles in bosnia should probably gotten there from afghanistan. the question i have come is if we do consider legal support to the syria and freedom fighters, how do we manage especially when it comes to no presence at all, how do we manage to control where those go and how they might get used? >> when i made a reference to seeing the nee
don't have the fbi interviews of the survivors conducted one or two days after the attack. we don't have the basic information about what was said the night of the attack, as of this date. so i remember the episode pretty well. our democratic friends felt like a john bolton didn't have the information needed to make an informed decision about ambassador bolton's qualifications. john bolton, the then ambassador, and democratic saying we're not going to go, we're not going to consider this domination domination in till we get basic answers to our concern. all i can do is that the concerns i have are greater today than they were before, and we're not even close to getting the basic answers. [inaudible] >> i have many more questions that need to be answered. [inaudible] >> ambassador rice released a statement about that meeting with senators mccain, graham and kelly ayotte saying in part in the course of the meeting we explained that the talking points provided by the intelligence community and the initial assessment upon which they were based were incorrect in the key respect. there
to do, two functions, one a law enforcement agency, a fbi for the t.a.r.p. with guns, badges, special agents, knocking down doors, executing search warrants, taking criminals out of their homes, putting them in cuffs, and in jail. congress realized pushing out so much money it was inevitably going to draw criminal flies to the government honey, and they needed a law enforcement agency to protect the money. second was oversight to bring transparency giving reports to congress and to the american people what was going on in the bailouts. to help guide treasury who is in charge of implementing the program to make sure the policy goals would be implemented. as mike is telling me about this, i had no idea why he was telling me until he said he was going to recommend me to the white house for this job. i was not interested in going to washington, i really had no interest in going back, and i started picking through the reasons to mike, getting rare my -- married in january, just started the mortgage fraud group, a big trial working years on to try coming up, and mike knocked my objections d
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9